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Ever wonder why camp hosts like to park their guests?

Why Camp Hosts Prefer to Park Guests...

Many RV parks require the camp host to escort guests to their sites. This is intended to be a welcome service, but some guests find it to be slightly annoying. As a camp host, people have told me many times that they are perfectly capable of finding their spot without assistance or grumble at the mention of being escorted. You may be able to guess why the camp host insists on parking you. It’s due to insurance reasons and the like. There are several additional reasons why camp hosts follow suit. These reasons are rarely thought of by those that take offence to the practice.

A camp host has to park you.

It is a requirement of some parks that the host escort all patrons to their site. In these cases, you could be the Dale Earnhardt of RV parking, but the host will be in trouble if they don’t take you to your site. Many parks require this because they want to ensure that you are driving slow. They want to know if the site works for you and if your rig and accompanying vehicle(s) fit in it.

Some parks may have confusing sewer hookups. One particular park I worked at had a cap that led to the water line shut off at each site. It looked like a sewer dump pipe! If we did not take each RV party to their designated site and show them the difference, park sites would on occasion have unpleasant messes. In short, as camp hosts in this particular park, we learned the importance of escorting rather quickly.

Camp hosts don’t know your driving skills.

You may have every confidence in yourself as a driver. The camp host, on the other hand, knows nothing of your driving prowess. They also don’t want to spend their entire day replacing a power box that was run into.

I personally judge how much “help” I give campers based on how they drive up to the site. If it looks like they know what they are doing, and they are not getting close to damaging anything, I generally just stand there and let them park. On the other hand, if the person comes in making wild corrections and is trying to slide into the spot three inches from the power box, I will give them some hand signals. Ultimately our job is to get you into your site safely, so you can enjoy your time at the park.

Don’t take it personally.

I have had many people take my parking assistance as a personal affront. Keep in mind that the host is only there to help. He or she knows that you have probably been driving for many hours and are most certainly tired. Tired people may not be the most observant people. The camp host is aware of each site and how RVs should be parked in each, being cognizant of possible obstacles like low hanging branches. They know exactly where the hookups are in the park so they can get you as close as possible to them. Think of the camp host as a tool in your driving toolbox; you don’t always need every tool for every trip, but it’s nice to know you have them if it’s not a good day.

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Levi and Natalie Henley

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Levi and Natalie Henley

Levi and Natalie Henley are a full time RVing couple.  Together with their three cats and dog, they travel around the country in their 2011 Sunstar Itasca seeking work camping gigs.  They share their adventures, seasonal job experiences, and travel tips on their website, HenleysHappyTrails.com.